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Published 24.10.2014 | Author : admin | Category : What A Man Wants From A Woman

While we like to think all the performers that appear on these pages present a blast of fresh air, Darlingside is exceptional.
All four members met at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., having sung together in one of the schoola€™s eight a cappella groups, the Octet, and at different times having taken the same songwriting course given by the esteemed Bernice Lewis. Don began performing at open mics at the boarding school he attended for high school and wrote songs with his roommate (remarkably, the song a€?Drowning Elvisa€? had its inception here).
Harris Paseltiner was born in Evanston, Ill., and grew up in nearby Glencoe, north of Chicago, near Lake Michigan. With once-a-week cello recitals starting at age 6, Harris developed a stage presence early.
His father became interested in a cappella singing when Dave was in middle school and early high school, so he also got into it. The formation of Darlingside was an evolutionary process that saw other talented student friends at Williams playing for awhile in different formats.
While a€?Blow the House Downa€? stood out as a favorite early on, as I listened to each song on EP 1 (2010) and Pilot Machines (2012) for analysis, it became harder and harder to favor any one song in particular. True to the banda€™s name, in a€?Good Man,a€? there are no easy phrases, no a€?darlingsa€? in here to describe the lingering addiction and loss of and separation from a difficult woman.
For this listener, the violin-cello intro in a€?Surrounda€? is the first full introduction on this album to Darlingsidea€™s particular sound. In a€?The Catbird Seat,a€? an oft-requested song from Darlingsidea€™s fan base, therea€™s a gossamer poetry in the lyrics.
The symbol of a drowning man in a€?Drowning Elvisa€? serves to create an image of someone left for dead after the crash and burn of a relationship. In Darlingsidea€™s debut effort, relationship dissolution gets a variety of innovative treatments a€” the group conducts a clinic on how to attack the subject melodically and lyrically from a number of angles. Darlingside collaborated with songwriter and gifted singer Heather Maloney to release the 2014 five-song EP Woodstock on Signature Sounds. If you like your musical heroes to rock out like the jackhammer of a rockabilly saint but also deliver song sonnets from a contemplative place, then David Olney is your man. Nine years late, here we are, getting ready to welcome him again to New York City (On March 13, another show at Kathryna€™s Space a€” a Nashville-Austin pipeline).
When he was 13, he got a guitar for Christmas, and after some lessons, could play a a€?really rousing version of a€?Row, Row, Row Your Boat.a€™a€? Davida€™s older brother, Peter, had a record collection with a lot of blues and bluegrass music, and it made a big impact.
After graduating high school, David attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. For a man who today has more than 30 albums to his credit, containing many songs considered masterpieces, things took a while to jell.
David displays an acute awareness of modern songwritinga€™s place on the historical spectrum.
David posts a weekly video (every Tuesday since August 2008) on YouTube, Facebook and his website that he calls a€?You Never Know.a€? Ita€™s a great way to get a taste of his off-the-cuff humor. As I was building the layout of this feature article, I found myself unprepared for the iconic beauty I encountered in the photos by Asia Kepka on Meg Hutchinsona€™s website.
A phone interview with Meg uncovered some of the unique elements that went into the creation of this fiercely dedicated poet and songsmith. Meg affectionately referred to her parents as a€?hippies,a€? [extremely bright hippies] and said that their record collection included all the classic stuff, including Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor and Jackson Browne.
When her grandmother passed away, an uncle sent the grandmothera€™s guitar, a beautiful old Martin, to Mega€™s family.
In eighth grade, Meg wrote a song, a€?Freedoma€™s Ocean,a€? about apartheid in South Africa for a geography project. In spite of the revelation that came after singing her apartheid song at the talent show, Meg, overwhelmed by the culture shift and her parentsa€™ unraveling marriage, put her musical ambitions aside in high school and concentrated on athletic pursuits. By the time she was 17, while attending Simona€™s Rock, Meg had her own apartment and worked at an organic farm.
Meg experienced many mood swings during her early years that she attributed to a€?artistic temperamenta€? but they became more pronounced as she got older.
Her first self-titled album grew out of her college poetry study, working on the farm and dealing with her varying emotional states.
Her next album, Against the Grey, was more formally produced at a studio by musician Robby Baier and released in 1999.
Meg had been a a€?huge Martin Sexton fan,a€? and wanted his producer, Crit Harmon, to produce a CD for her. Passim, the renowned folk club in Boston, runs a fundraising festival each year called a€?The Cutting Edge of the Campfire.a€? Meg was grouped with fellow songwriters Antje Duvekot, Anne Heaton and Natalia Zukerman. The banda€™s sound, combining contemporary folk, chamber music, a cappella and rock a€™na€™ roll, permeates the atmosphere with a charged, electric quality, like an approaching storm. There, at her urging, they were taught to a€?kill your darlings,a€? those lyrics that come too easily, are too facile or a€?clever,a€? that get in the way of the forward movement of the piece.
At his mothera€™s urging, Auyona€™s classical training (Suzuki method) on the violin began at age 3.
At Williams, his performing was confined to college events, occasionally solo and occasionally with friends. Harris good-naturedly said that, counter to most stories we hear, he ran off the soccer field in kindergarten yelling, a€?Dad, can I take violin lessons?a€? His entire family a€” parents, a brother and a sister a€” were all music lovers. As he describes it: a€?I used to go to school early to play in a chamber orchestra, and then had a period of symphony orchestra each day. There was no stage fright issue getting up to play original songs with guitar at open mics in high school. In high school, Dave was introduced to new music by friends a€” Dispatch, Guster, John Mayer, Pat McGee and generally softer alt rock stuff. It has a cinematic feel to it, and opens the door for a savvy film-maker to use as part of a soundtrack (or at least the film credits outro) in a story about taking an unexpected path and looking for a second chance for redemption. That, and the combination of the delicacy of the melody and the deliberate hesitancy in the vocal phrasing carries with it the sensation of heartache.
An a cappella intro with high, almost wailing oh-oh background choral effect leads into a rapid tremolo on electric guitar and a matching beat on snare drum. Especially when further reflection sets in: only out of your lips could those words pull me out of my head. For me, their version of the title track eclipses both versions originally heard by CSNY and Joni Mitchell.
I believe theya€™ll continue to thrill audiences with their vibrant melodies, meaningful lyrics and killer chops a€” both singing and playing a€” for a long, long time. He describes his childhood as a€?idyllic.a€? In that small, tranquil town, in 1950s America, his school gave dance classes. Later, David learned how to play a€?Whata€™d I Saya€? from a Ray Charles record in Petera€™s collection while he was away at college.
A fellow UNC dropout, newly married musician friend, Bland Simpson, asked if David could get him a job there.
Hea€™d been writing sporadically and had been advised to test his craft in a milieu that would allow him to gauge his prowess. His second, Deeper Well, in 1988, from which Emmylou Harris covered the title track on her Grammy Award-winning album Wrecking Ball (1995) and essentially ushered David into the front ranks of Nashville songwriters.
Furthermore, videos from Hippie Jacka€™s Music Festival show David in the company of monster guitarist Sergio Webb. Sometimes, the patter can be a lead-in to the main lyric, as in the aforementioned a€?Sweet Poison,a€? where an imagined exchange takes place between Socrates and the jailer who serves the hemlock: a€?Would you mind getting me three lumps of sugar?


He opens each installment with some wry commentary on whata€™s happening with him and follows it up by playing a song (usually new) with the story behind it. If you think you can handle it, sit and bask in the company of the man about whom the late legendary Townes Van Zant said, a€?Anytime anyone asks me who my favorite music writers are, I say Mozart, Lightnina€™ Hopkins, Bob Dylan, and Dave Olney a€¦ Dave Olney is one of the best songwriters Ia€™ve ever heard a€” and thata€™s true. Ita€™s the aural equivalent of having very expensive imported chocolate melt on your tongue a€” a velvety, bittersweet tone that carries with it all the pain and all the dreams in her life. The picture I chose for this first page reminds me of a George Hurrell Hollywood photograph from the 1940s. Mega€™s father has been an English professor at Simona€™s Rock College (now called Bard College at Simona€™s Rock) all her life.
She remembered, once, after playing in the yard, she came stomping into the kitchen in protest while her mother was playing Bob Dylan.
She went to the Great Barrington Rudolf Steiner School, one of the network of Waldorf schools.
Simona€™s Rock College had an early entry program for students with good grades, so she began her college career at around age 15 and, because her parents worked there, got free tuition. She said that she had no idea how serious things were, but attempted to express the depths of her feelings through poetry and music. Meg was now being managed by the same woman whoa€™d helped her earlier, and a€?was teaching me about the music business,a€? Meg said. Shea€™d met him at Falcon Ridge Folk Festival, but was too shy to present herself as a prospective client. After my early infatuation with a€?Everything Familiar,a€? ita€™s difficult to pick a favorite. She was hospitalized by July of that year, and after several months of treatment and therapy in and out of a mental health facility, she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She was signed by Red House Records and in 2008, Come Up Full, produced again by Crit Harmon, was released.
This time around, she ponders both the depths shea€™s plunged and the heights to which her bipolar disorder has taken her. Theya€™d been on the same circuit together and quickly realized how good the combination was and how much fun they were having. In quelling her bipolar symptoms, Meg lost the manic creative highs, but forges on, banking on truthtelling for inspiration. Locked into air guitar, air fiddle, air harmony, listening to a€?Blow the House Downa€? from their full-length CD, Pilot Machines. He received a fellowship to study music in Ireland, Brazil and Turkey in the 2007-08 school year and came away from his year abroad convinced that he could pursue music as a career. There were Suzuki violin lessons early on for one or two years, which never took hold, and a few starter lessons in guitar at 13 to 14 years old. Then after school it was solo practice, lessons and chamber music rehearsals and musicianship classes and recitals on the weekends.a€? He picked up the guitar in high school and began experimenting with songwriting. I was forced to be in a play in second grade and I had one line, which I delivered incorrectly.a€? Even at Williams, when he took the songwriting course (which had a performance element), he still dealt with stage fright any time he had to perform.
Key members of the band got back together in 2009 and moved into a house just outside of Northampton. Dave Senft (performance anxiety conquered) takes most of the lead vocals and Don Mitchell steps in for key songs.
Therea€™s a depth that elicits from me an astonished a€?Oh my God a€¦ are you serious?a€? again and again. While there is cello accompaniment on this, ita€™s practically a stand-alone as an a cappella piece. Davea€™s pleading lead vocal essentially performs a duet with the violin-cello combo and the voices of the others slide in behind him while backing handclaps effectively increase the listenera€™s pulse rate.
He plied his paper route and could cut through the woods on a daily basis to get to his best frienda€™s house when he was only 8. David came to view the South through the lens of family, rather than the prevailing a€™60s view of Southerners in sheets, eager to lynch the errant person of color. A friend from Chapel Hill, Ben Jones, was acting in the Atlanta Childrena€™s Theater and got David a part in a play, which parlayed into a steady gig, enabling him to stay in Atlanta with his girlfriend. Emmylou also later recorded Davida€™s a€?Jerusalem Tomorrowa€? and a€?1917,a€? about a French prostitute who provides solace to a young World War I soldier. The beauty of the melody and the elegance of the lyrics are a mixture of ecstasy and sorrow, capturing the rages of fate and nature and the brave transfiguring resiliency of their survivors. I like my poison sweet.a€? While most of Davida€™s stage banter leans toward conversational whimsy, it can shift in a heartbeat to something theatrical, infusing his performances with an undercurrent of drama a€” laced with wicked humor. This is unlike her first song to get its hooks in me, a€?Everything Familiar,a€? from her previous album, The Crossing. Her mother would go on walks and play the recorder and both her mom and dad sang lullabies to all three kids.
Her mother stayed home to raise the children and later became a writing teacher at the same college. The family didna€™t have enough money to visit her often, so she remained an elusive revered figure.
Their grief for the loss of their matriarch seemed to transfer to the guitar and everyone wept upon seeing the damage. She sat onstage in the auditorium, calmly playing for the very first time in front of an audience.
There were manic periods of great energy where shea€™d write and perform, feeling very powerful.
The album, named after watching Maine fishermen pull their nets from the water, is full of new self-awareness. The steady, metronomic snare beat and driving electric guitar strum crank up my heart rate and provoke ecstasy.
His mandolin playing (minimal before the trip) improved exponentially with exposure to the culture and musicians a€” and their musicianship a€” in those countries. Don credits performing with Chorus Angelicus, a touring childrena€™s choir not connected with school, as his most intense and formative early experience. Early on, he was drawn to the music in Disney movies (The little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, etc.) and the music of Elton John. He didna€™t start getting over it until he began busking regularly in Boston and abroad, after college. Dona€™s lead vocal is softer and therea€™s a wonderful harmony blend on the passage pull me undera€¦ The sonorous cello creates a mournful, lament-like undercurrent.
Having seen the band perform a€?Whippoorwilla€? live a couple of times, Ia€™m also partial to that track from the EP. An enterprising woman, Marcia Wilson, moved to Chapel Hill from Maryland and opened a cafe, The Cata€™s Cradle. The affair ended and, after a year-and-a-half in childrena€™s theater, David left for Nashville. Its lyrics capture the horror of war a€” death in the trenches and too many corpses to bury. While therea€™s a perfectly lovely studio version on YouTube, I prefer the completely acoustic performance on his website a€?Newsa€? page, done for the The Nature Conservancya€™s If Trees Could Sing project. His songa€™ a€?Sweet Poison,a€? with its spoken introduction, blossoms like the love child of Jack Kerouac and ZZ Top. They encouraged children to be creative a€” allowing them to move their bodies, draw, build stuff and make gardens a€” a path to letting the child be a whole person.


The entire family suspended their normal routine and made a pilgrimage to the Martin guitar factory in Nazareth, Pa., to get it fixed. She laughed as she recalled how, at one point, shea€™d fallen in love with a champion high school wrestler and lost him to a cheerleader. One friend had a four-track recording setup and allowed her to use his living room as a studio and put the tracks together. He played in numerous orchestras and his main interest was chamber music (he started in earnest at age 10), specifically piano trios (piano, violin and cello). His father helped him learn the lyrics to a€?Under the Seaa€? (from The Little Mermaid) so hea€™d be able to sing it more effectively. Both his brothera€™s record collection and visiting his Southern relatives infused in him the love of folk music.
This was a revelation to David, who didna€™t know anything beyond playing small gigs locally.
Its desperate refrain, tonight the war is over, brings home the futility of pawns in the clutches of a conflict between world powers. One main teacher acted as a a€?a€?corea€? teacher and a€?that teacher would become like a third parent,a€? Meg said. Meg said that this was a powerful, extremely moving experience for her, bonding her with her family over the value of music and this particular instrument. She wrote an unrequited love song that was the extent of her song production during high school.
She finally met Crit at a Folk Alliance conference and he agreed to allow her to demo a song for him.
A long-practiced head-swiveling vigilance is the only thing that saves me from an express bus as it blows past me through the caution light at the 15th Street intersection. In high school, Auyon started to really enjoy vocal harmonies and the bands that used them.
As he explains: a€?We fooled around with the idea of starting a band back in college, and then got serious about it in the fall of 2009. He took trumpet lessons in elementary and middle school, but drifted away from that (hardly having practiced to begin with, he says). Although ita€™s tempting to dissect every song, space is limited, so Ia€™ve just selected some particularly noteworthy pieces. AsA  he explains: a€?We fooled around with the idea of starting a band back in college, and then got serious about it in the fall of 2009. His entry into life as a performer came when he quit the basketball team to take part in a school play. It became the center of my life.a€? Performing there, David began sliding his own songs into the middle of a set of Carter Family songs and the like, figuring if no one noticed, hea€™d written a good song. In a€?Jerusalem Tomorrow,a€? a charlatan, peddling fake miracles, is told about the exploits of Jesus and tracks him down. You did a good job!a€? Meg was actually overwhelmed with the sudden knowledge that she had just experienced what she was meant to do.
The song demo grew into a series of a€?living room sessionsa€? where a€?hea€™d rip my songs to shreds.a€? Crit would dissect each song Meg presented and send her home with pieces that were like a puzzle for her to put together again. While in high school, he took classes in music and performed in chorus, assemblies, plays and concerts. Other instruments a€” guitar, bass, percussion a€” were self-taught or learned from friends. His love of theatricality sprang from the first moment he stepped on a stage with a room full of adults waiting to hear what he had to say. Deciding to join him, we hear: Dona€™t see how too much can go wrong a€¦ Wea€™re headed for Jerusalem tomorrow.
They left the guitar there, and it was later shipped (safely this time) back to Massachusetts. She walked out of the school, into a snowy day, carrying her guitar case, feeling that she was a€?home.a€? The song was so well-received that later she performed it at a number of open mics in town.
She told one interviewer, Bob Edwards (Sirius xm), that it was possible some days, between tips and selling CDs to make $200 in a few hours.
Crit may not have known what he was dealing with, perhaps expecting Meg to dissolve and run away in tears. For our first two years as band mates, all of us lived in a house together, and we took turns cooking meals for one another. He was part of the release of one album, the eponymous Simpson (1971), and he learned a lot about the music business during that brief time. They had no name a€” just a€?David Olney and his band.a€? The fiddle player quit right away and David recruited an electric guitarist.
During this period, shea€™d express elements about her recurring depression, but not own it as being about herself.
Meg accepted every criticism and rebuilt her songs, her lyrics becoming leaner and more concise, less dense than her earlier work.
He performed in symphonic orchestral performances in high school and sang in an a cappella group toward the end of high school. My tendency to get swept up in melody and rhythm led to a late-blooming awareness of Mega€™s poetic lyricism. He also participated in symphonic orchestral performances in high school and did a little bit of acting in college.
Similarly, my knowledge of Mega€™s journey through the dark landscape of bipolar disorder came only after my online discovery of other interviews shea€™d done.
This might explain his ease as frequent spokesperson (everyone takes turns) at Darlingside gigs. There are videos of the group from the Austin City Limits TV show on YouTube, showing a youthful David Olney, as a rocker, leading the band through a wide range of material. As I continued listening to her music, each bit of knowledge gave the songs greater weight.
A  I learned something from every man I met or exchanged emails with, and Lou taught me a few words in Spanish.A  Ole!
We can take a little walk, maybe get our feet wet, and then lie on a blanket and listen to the waves.
I do the same thing myself, when the mood strikes.A  And how about this for being an "in tune with women" kinda guy?A  A few days after I had ordered myself 2 new green dresses and several in black to add to my collection from a mail order company named Newport News, he sent an email asking:A  "So, what are you wearing right now? A  For Christ Sake!!A  How about saving the Taxpayers a buck?A  In addition to that $6 million you've already blown by hovering and covering me, and scheduling a proper Face to Base meeting in your office; at my convenience? Dramatic, but no drama.A  Short black skirt, or long black dress?A  Heels or boots?A  Camo, or commando?
Until then, as in the end,there is much more to come.A A A  Once Upon a Time, a little mushroom popped through the moss covered ground of the Southeast Alaska Rainforest. Grant, Attorney at Law, Juneau, AK From Wedding Bells to Tales to Tell: The Affidavit of Eric William Swanson, my former spouse AFFIDAVIT OF SHANNON MARIE MCCORMICK, My Former Best Friend THE AFFIDAVIT OF VALERIE BRITTINA ROSE, My daughter, aged 21 THE BEAGLE BRAYS! HELL'S BELLS: THE TELLS OF THE ELVES RING LOUD AND CLEAR IDENTITY THEFT, MISINFORMATION, AND THE GETTING THE INFAMOUS RUNAROUND Double Entendre and DoubleSpeak, Innuendos and Intimidation, Coercion v Common Sense, Komply (with a K) v Knowledge = DDIICCKK; Who's Gunna Call it a Draw?



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